Intentional Piecing // Sewing Book Review + Giveaway

IntentionalPiecingBook

I recently received a review copy Amy Friend’s beautiful new book, Intentional Piecing, from Lucky Spool Media.

Intentional Piecing Details
Title: Intentional Piecing: From Fussy Cutting to Foundation Piecing
Author: Amy Friend
Softcover, 159 pages, published by Lucky Spool Media
List Price: $28.95

Why I Would Recommend a Friend Take a Look
MyTribeQuilt

The projects in the book are clever, the book is well written, and the photography is lovely (Amy did her own photography, on location in New England).  When I sat down to read through the book, I knew instantly that I wanted to make the My Tribe Quilt. I like books that are visually appealing, have clear-cut instructions, and inspire me to sit down and sew.

Amy has been sharing her projects on her blog, During Quiet Time, if you want to see them all.

tellmeastoryblock_butterfly

This butterfly is thrilled to be flying about on a lovely spring day #tellmeastoryquilt

Design and Feel
The book is well designed–the layout and font are easy to follow/read, and it is a beautiful book. I like that there is both a styled and full shot of each of the projects.

Amy’s style is very different than my own–in her introduction, she writes, “Intentional piecing is a conscious, deliberate process of fabric selection to suit a particular pattern design (or vice versa) or aesthetic…. The work is planned with a specific outcome in mind. Every effort is made while piecing to place fabrics carefully and align them well within pattern boundaries for the intended effect.” Since I tend to ascribe to the mad hatter method of quilting, I appreciated her tips on being intentional throughout.  Amy has a vibrant and measured voice throughout the book. I liked it.

Layout
Amy’s book begins with 12 pages of tools, a paper-piecing how-to, and what kind of fabric to stash.

After that, she dives right into the projects, everything from a magnetic pin tray to a few bags/clutches to an appliquéd cardigan to a pillow to a few quilts. There are 14 different projects, along with ten 10” pictorial paper-pieced blocks. My baby liked the flower block the best.

pictorialpaperpiecedblocks

There is an acknowledgements/resources page, and 40+ pages of templates at the back.

 

#tellmeastoryquilt

TellMeAStoryQuilt

Amy is hosting a quilt along of sorts on her blog, During Quiet Time, featuring her Tell Me a Story Quilt.  I have seen these blocks popping up on Instagram, with the warning that they are addictive. In the book, Amy stresses that this baby quilt is all about the process–pick two fabrics that “tell a story” instead of worrying about the overall color scheme.

tellmeastoryquilt_sheep

this little lamb likes to run wild and free, but her mama has different ideas, and prefers the safety of the fence and the company of her friends

I intended to make one block. And then one became two. And then all of a sudden I had fussy cut enough center squares for a few more blocks. I figure one of my sisters will have another baby eventually, so I think I will keep making these blocks, slowly and intentionally. I love this fun take on an I-Spy quilt, and I love that it is elevated from I-Spy to a Storytelling quilt.

TellMeAStorybutton

If you make a block (or 50), post them on Instagram by June 1 with the hashtag #intentionalpiecingbook and #tellmeastoryquilt for a chance to win a fabric bundle. More information here.

I Wish the Book Included
I am an impulsive quilter, and I don’t have a scanner or copier at home. I wish the book included a way to print the paper piecing templates from a home computer.

Giveaway + Purchase Info

Purchase Info: Lucky Spool Media  USE CODE FRIEND30 for 30% off

Lucky Spool sent me an extra copy!

Leave a comment for a chance to win a copy! You can leave any comment, if you want to leave a favorite gardening tip (or a what-not-to-do), that would be lovely. We are planting our first real garden tomorrow!

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123 Comments

  1. Leesa
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    Good luck with your garden. We use Earthboxes and have great success.

  2. Posted May 6, 2016 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    I think this book is a must have! Happy gardening – don’t crowd the new plants, pay attention to their water needs until well established and enjoy the blossoms!
    @susansquiltstudio

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the tips!

  3. Lindsey V
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

    I have seen several “Super” reviews in the quilting community about this book. I would love to have a copy. I’ve been fussy cutting and foundation paper piecing for a year now, and love learning new techniques.

    And for advice on the garden: start simple. It’s a lot more work than you ever anticipate. Start with basics that grow well in your geographical zone, or a favorite veggie that you will look forward to working on and reaping the benefits.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

      great tip. Thank you. We have four garden boxes, so we are going to try some square foot gardening this summer. Its so tempting to “go big” so thanks for the reminder to start simple.

  4. Tonia Jeffery
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

    Gloves are your friend.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

      isn’t that the truth. I’m always too lazy to get mine and then i always regret it!

  5. Cindy Krutsinger
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    Would love to win this book. Love the Tell Me a Story quilt. The only tip I can think of right now is if it says to plant in sun do it; not in the shade and vice versa. And my plants always grow bigger than I think they will so allow plenty of room. Love your blog!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the tip. It’s always so tempting to plant things where you want them to be, not where they want to be. :)

  6. Cheryl Campbell
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

    Gardening . . . of course it depends on where you are – I have recently lived in Eastern Canada, New York and now in Seattle and all three places I have had gardens with one common thriving plant . . . Primrose. These are delightful little border plants that bloom continuously, don’t need alot of sun, prefer wet “feet”, so do well in many locations and climates. Also, perennials are the way to go – little more investment upfront, but years of enjoyment ahead.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the tip. It’s so crazy to me how much where you live affects what you can grow. I loved the ranunculus in my garden in portland, but they don’t grow well in utah! i’ll check out Primrose.

  7. Sharon Linders
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

    Plant twice as many peas as you think you want! The kids always eat them right off the vine!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

      great tip. thanks!

  8. Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    If you can set up some kind of automatic watering system, do it – it will make your life SO MUCH EASIER. Also, there is a variety of heirloom cherry tomato called Coyote – they are crazy prolific and tasty and perfect for kids to munch on or to throw into salads. Thanks for the giveaway!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

      that’s a very smart idea. My sister is putting sprinklers in her garden this summer. I’ll look into it. Also, I’ll check out Coyote tomatoes. Thank you!

  9. Susan Stanton
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

    Hi Katie, What a nice review of the book you did. Makes me want a copy! Gardening tip, use the best composted soil that you have. Plants love compost, so use plenty.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

      I’m glad the review was helpful. I currently have half of a truckload of great soil in my driveway, but I want to start composting again, too!

  10. Jen Beatty
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:29 pm | Permalink

    i would love to own this book as it looks amazing. Read the direction/suggestion about how far down to plant bulbs for onions, etc and how far apart other items like peppers should be planted apart, good luck!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for the tip. I’m not always the best at reading instructions…

  11. Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:34 pm | Permalink

    Gardening is addictive! Each year I want to plant more and try growing new veggies. Good luck!

  12. Betsy S
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:41 pm | Permalink

    Have a gardening buddy and swap veggies as they seem to all come in at once. We grow green peppers and swap for tomatoes.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

      oh. That is SUCH a good idea! Thanks!

  13. Posted May 6, 2016 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

    I’ve been eyeing these blocks on Instagram. We usually plant on the May long weekend but it has snowed on that weekend the last couple of years, so we watch the weather reports daily. Good luck with the garden.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

      We wanted to plant a few weeks ago, but conventional wisdom in Utah is to wait for Mother’s Day, so we decided to follow suit. Good luck with your garden!

  14. E. A.
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    Let the kids help!! They will love the satisfaction of knowing they contributed to the food on their plate – and maybe they’ll be more likely to eat it! :)

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

      That’s a great tip. We have 4 garden boxes in our “new” house, and I’ve been tempted to let each of my kids have one, pick what to plant, etc. thanks!

  15. Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    I’m a follower of Amy’s and have been seeing all of her story blocks. I’ve been tempted to make some myself. I can’t wait to see her book. It looks fantastic.

  16. Alice
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

    I too, have seen a number of bloggers commenting and showing work from this book, especially the Tell Me a Story quilt. I love it. I love the intentionality of quilting. As a newer quilter, I try to focus on the process and to take my time rather than racing through a quilt. However, that leads to lots of unstarted projects! I’d love to have a copy of this book.
    As far as gardening tips go, a couple of years ago we planted a garden on top of part of our lawn, using a layering or “back to Eden” method. It works so well! I weed once in the spring and once during the summer. In Nova Scotia, it’s too early to plant most things, although avid gardeners are putting in peas and some early greens. We can expect frost for a few more weeks yet. Enjoy your weekend!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:45 pm | Permalink

      Its a really fun book! We moved into a house that has garden boxes, so we are going to try our hand at that. In Utah, conventional wisdom says you can plant Mother’s Day weekend. I hope spring comes quickly for you!

  17. vikkib
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Those tell me a story blocks have been tempting me for weeks! Thanks for a look at the other projects!

    Gardening tips – don’t forget to thin the carrots a little after they sprout so they can grow to a decent size! I forgot a few plays and had tons of really tiny carrots, lol.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

      That’s good advice. I can totally see myself forgetting

  18. Posted May 6, 2016 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

    Love those blocks. My other projects mean this want to do block will be postponed for later, but I love the idea of intentionality. Thanks for sharing! Oh, and with gardens…just do a little every day so things don’t have a chance to get out of hand =)

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

      Great advice. Thank you!

  19. sarah caston
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 5:03 pm | Permalink

    Garden: lower your expectations. I know that sounds pessimistic, but that’s what I’ve had to do with our first garden this year! Nothing is going as planned so far and that’s ok :)

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

      That’s great advice. For life and gardens 😉

  20. Francine
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 5:15 pm | Permalink

    This looks like a great book. My favourite flowers to put in my garden are George Washington geraniums. They are very pretty and grow fairly easily.

  21. Allison C
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 6:05 pm | Permalink

    I would love to check this book out

  22. Amy Verne
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 6:06 pm | Permalink

    Amend your soil if needed and don’t crowd your plants. Good luck. Hope the weather cooperates.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:05 am | Permalink

      thanks for the tip!

  23. Posted May 6, 2016 at 6:08 pm | Permalink

    Just enjoy the process, and make sure you water water water!! I always kill my plants because I don’t water

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:03 am | Permalink

      great reminder. i’m the same way.

  24. Jacklynn A Grimm
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 6:37 pm | Permalink

    My gardening tip: make sure that it can handle full sun if that’s all it gets. My husband buys beautiful hanging baskets for our South facing balcony and they never last if they can’t handle the sun!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:05 am | Permalink

      great advice. i think that explains why my hanging basket in our south facing balcony is not loving life :/

  25. Ashley
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 7:54 pm | Permalink

    Love this review, sounds like a lovely book. No gardening tips to share though!

  26. Josee
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

    Do the garden with kids. Théâtre are good gardenerstr!

    • Josee
      Posted May 6, 2016 at 8:05 pm | Permalink

      I want to say they are good gardeners!

      • Katie Blakesley
        Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:04 am | Permalink

        great tip. I’m hoping my kids’ enthusiasm lasts all summer long… or at least for a while.

  27. Kate P
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 9:05 pm | Permalink

    I never have luck with flowers, but veggies- that’s another story! We use raised beds with great success. Good luck!

  28. Gwen Wehner
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 9:27 pm | Permalink

    Looks like a great book! Thanks for sharing, and also for the gardening tips from your readers! If this will be your first garden, start small. And definitely get the kids involved. You can always expand with the next planting season!

  29. quiltfairy33
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

    Wish I had a gardening tip for you but I’m learning a lot just by reading these comments!

  30. Katy M
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 9:49 pm | Permalink

    Good luck with your garden – I can’t offer you any tips I’m an awful gardener!

  31. Posted May 6, 2016 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

    Thanks for the review.I liked the through way you write a review. Letting us who can’t see the book get a better idea if we want to spend the money on it

  32. Beth T.
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 10:50 pm | Permalink

    When you plant roses, put some epsom salts in the bottom of the hole. I learned that from my mother, who grew beautiful roses, and I’ve always had good luck when I’ve done it. Just sprinkle in a good amount–maybe a cups worth, maybe less, then set the rose on top, then fill it with dirt.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:02 am | Permalink

      thank you for the tip. that’s a new one for me!

  33. Sally Ann
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 11:35 pm | Permalink

    I became fast friends with an 80-year old man at my community garden when I was a grad student. He taught me to place a single match in the hole before planting my tomato plants. It was for the sulfur. Charlie is long-gone, but I have great tomatoes every year, and they remind me of how often you reap unexpected blessings in the garden. May you enjoy yours–even the weeding!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 1:53 am | Permalink

      what a great story and tip. thank you so much for sharing.

  34. melanie c
    Posted May 6, 2016 at 11:51 pm | Permalink

    My gardening tip is not to plant a garden if deer live in your backyard :)

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:02 am | Permalink

      that is a great tip! I’ve never seen deer in this neighborhood, but my friend lives half a mile away near a ravine and her garden always is a feast for the deer! i’m guessing you have had experience with this. i’m sorry!

  35. Phyllis
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 12:59 am | Permalink

    Use Miracle Grow.

  36. Chris
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 2:21 am | Permalink

    Talk to the locals and know your soil. Every area is different.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:01 am | Permalink

      great suggestion, thanks. there is a really great University extension program around here, so I have subscribed to their emails. They will even diagnose problems with plants via email!

  37. Posted May 7, 2016 at 3:13 am | Permalink

    I am sorry I won’t leave any tip:( I am terrible at gardening! Problably the worst in the whole world. But I would love to win Amy’s book, it is for sure fabulous! I love Amy’s paper-piecing pattern and I just saw many that are so lovely and clever at the same time! That rose in the vase with little doily under it – brilliant!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:00 am | Permalink

      then you will like someone else’s suggestion for gardening: the farmer’s market has beautiful veggies :)

  38. Mary
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 3:28 am | Permalink

    I like the book. Thanks for including suggestions on what would make the book better. Plant marigolds to keep some insects away. Once you see a wee, get it out. They multiply fast. If you have deer, you’ll have rabbits, too. Perhaps other gardeners can help with preventing your garden just being an organic esting place for the creatures.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:00 am | Permalink

      our garden in virginia was often an organic eating place for creatures! so frustrating. thanks for the marigold idea!

  39. Claire Sutherland
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 4:10 am | Permalink

    If you have space I would suggest a home compost bin. So satisfying to turn your own rubbish into compost and saves buying new stuff for planting each year x

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:59 pm | Permalink

      That’s a great idea, thank you. We had a great one in Portland, but haven’t figured one out here. I’ll get on that!

  40. Rita S.
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 6:10 am | Permalink

    The best gardening tip I ever got was:

    Plant your feet in your garden every day!! It’s amazing what can happen in just a couple of days … from fruit getting huge (zucchini can turn into a baseball bat overnight!!) to pests devouring a plant.

    Thanks for the chance to win!!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:59 pm | Permalink

      that *is* a great tip. thank you!

  41. Janet
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 7:36 am | Permalink

    I’ve never paper pieced so this would be a good book to start with!

    As far as gardening, when I prepare my beds for flowers I use mushroom compost and peat to amend the soil. The flowers seem to like it so I’m guessing your garden will like it as well. Also gloves will be your friend! I also use Deer Out to keep the deer from eating everything! They have a blend for rabbits and other critters. It’s natural so it doesn’t have the nasty coyote urine smell that many others have. Good luck!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:57 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the advice. I don’t think we will have deer, but you never know. In Virginia, the squirrels *always* ate all of our strawberries!

  42. abby
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 7:42 am | Permalink

    I think a watering system is invaluable. I just put in a simple weeping hose with a timer for 20 min twice a day. It’s much more efficient than hand watering and my veggies are looking amazing. Good luck with the garden.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:57 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the suggestion!! I will look into it.

  43. Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:00 am | Permalink

    Oh my! Thank you for asking for gardening tips! I have enjoyed reading the comments as I really, really need all the help I can get! Thanks for sharing your extra copy of this book too!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:58 pm | Permalink

      there are some *really* great tips here! happy gardening.

  44. Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:03 am | Permalink

    The Farmer’s Market sells lovely vegetables. That’s my garden tip.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

      best one yet!!!!

  45. diane b
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:28 am | Permalink

    Hi Katie,
    My tomatoes didn’t do well last season so a friend told me she read that the ground temp should be 60 degrees before putting those precious seedlings into the dirt. Hmm, I’m gonna wait a week or two til it warms a bit.

  46. Lisa Marie
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:29 am | Permalink

    I’ve never planted a garden and can barely keep plants alive so no advice from me. This looks like a fun book, thanks for sharing.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:58 pm | Permalink

      ha ha. that is sometimes me. i’m hoping this time it goes better!

  47. linynp
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:49 am | Permalink

    He book looks amazing! Thank you for a well detailed review!

    • linynp
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 9:50 am | Permalink

      Oh and gloves are must with gardening and knee foam pads.

  48. sorchagirl
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 10:33 am | Permalink

    Be sure to leave more space than you think you need between planting such veggies as broccoli, chard, lettuce. In my experience, they grow larger than the spacing recommended on the package or pick in a start. Growing your own veggies is fun and tasty. Thanks for the overview of Amy’s book. I’ve enjoyed the Tell Me a Story blocks.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:56 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the advice. I’ll remember that.

  49. Kim Piter
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 10:56 am | Permalink

    I have been a fan of Amy’s work and have purchased some of some of her patterns. I would love the book. I live in the desert where water is precious so I have learned to grow drought tolerant plants. I had no idea that I would love these types of plants!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

      Smart idea. Its amazing the variety of beauty in the world. I have lived in Oregon or Virginia for the last decade +, where we didn’t even need a sprinkler system. Its odd to move back to the west where you need to worry about this!

  50. Jenna O
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:28 am | Permalink

    I´m waiting to see my pionies grow :)

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:55 pm | Permalink

      peonies are the prettiest! I hope they are beautiful this year!

  51. Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:55 am | Permalink

    I am no help to you in the garden, even cacti die in my care! Thanks so much for the chance to win!

  52. Jeanette Tuttle-Hamer
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for introducing me to Amy’s blog..I love her creativity and would love the book as many of the quilts are getting my creativity going! i live in Western Pennsylvania and one of my favorites to grow is kale. To my amazement, it continues to grow until a deep freeze hits and even that doesn’t kill it. It just stops growing for a while. We love kale and just a few plants keep us supplied most of the year. Good Luck.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

      You are welcome. And that is totally crazy about the kale!

  53. M
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 3:05 pm | Permalink

    Oh I’d love to win a copy of this beautiful book! Gardening… I love gardening but I live in central Europe so I am not sure that my tips would help you since I am not familiar with your climate. Some things cannot be planned. e.g. we had very late snow last week. 95% of vine and apple blossoms are ruined this year. Gardening is a lot about trial and error. Still enjoy!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:54 pm | Permalink

      oh, i’m so sorry about the ruined crops! We planted 12 fruit trees in our front yard (an urban orchard of sorts) and hope to eventually get fruit! good to know that a lot of it is trial and error. nice to know how to set expectations!

  54. sharon galli
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 6:13 pm | Permalink

    I once planted wild arugula and let some go to seed. I was picking arugula until winter and early into the next spring. It grew everywhere. I made argula pesto, arugula hummus and many more

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:53 pm | Permalink

      that sounds delicious. I actually bought some arugula seeds, so hopefully mine will grow half as good as yours.

  55. Kathy E.
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:18 pm | Permalink

    This book looks like a perfect book for me as I’ve collected fabrics to make an I-Spy type of quilt for a future grandchild. I love the look of yours! My gardening tip: be careful with perennial ground covers as they tend to spreeeeeead like crazy! If you decide to use them, contain them with some type of edging.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:53 pm | Permalink

      You definitely should look into buying the book/making the quilt, then :) Thanks for the tip. That’s a great one.

  56. Amy
    Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:33 pm | Permalink

    I’m the one who could use the gardening tips! Love the blocks and quilt.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 7, 2016 at 11:52 pm | Permalink

      lots of great tips in the comments if you need some too :)

  57. Robin
    Posted May 8, 2016 at 12:01 am | Permalink

    I don’t know anything about gardens but I hope yours turns out great – and happy Mother’s Day!

  58. Posted May 8, 2016 at 1:31 am | Permalink

    I have an ongoing fight with the dandelions all spring and summer, I remove them mechanically.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:41 pm | Permalink

      ha! i feel like i’m digging out dandelions every. single. day.

  59. Posted May 8, 2016 at 8:01 am | Permalink

    I do all the planning behind our vegetable garden, but then leave the operational stuff up to my husband. I only come in play when it comes to harvesting and eating 😉 Thanks for a chance to win.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:41 pm | Permalink

      i think that is the best tip i’ve heard :)

  60. Posted May 8, 2016 at 8:56 pm | Permalink

    I liked this review, so detailed and informative!

    Gardening tips? Eeek – I don’t do a lot of gardening but when I do I make sure all my plants are good for my area, are easy to take care of and have a purpose – is it ground cover? a bush for privacy? lots of tulips and irises just to have pretties? But my tips are pretty boring so think I’ll read through the comments and look for some others ;).

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:40 pm | Permalink

      thanks for stopping by and your tip. i like the idea of thinking through things–i’m usually not as detailed/planned as i should be!

  61. charmedlife2006
    Posted May 9, 2016 at 10:57 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the great book review and the giveaway. This book looks fantastic and I will add it to my craft book “wish list”. Good luck with your garden. I love purple so have a spot in my garden with all purple flowers. So that is my suggestion for you…if you have a favorite color, pick a spot in your garden and dedicate it to that!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:39 pm | Permalink

      i love this idea. thanks!

  62. suzanne
    Posted May 9, 2016 at 12:22 pm | Permalink

    Plant tomatoes very deep, getting at least 2/3 of height of plant underground. Roots will grow all along the planted stem and make your plant stronger. Also, throw some calcium in planting hole – or side dress with calcium later – for best tomato taste.

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:39 pm | Permalink

      thanks for the tip. that’s a new one for me!

  63. Trina A
    Posted May 9, 2016 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

    Save your egg shells, crush them up, and mix in with soil when planting

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:38 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for the tip!

  64. Posted May 11, 2016 at 9:13 am | Permalink

    Looks like a great book! I don’t have any gardening tips, anything I plant tends to die :(

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 11, 2016 at 10:38 pm | Permalink

      yeah. that’s my problem too. :/

  65. Posted May 12, 2016 at 2:19 am | Permalink

    Hope you don’t mind me crashing your quilting world! Love all the comments too! Our first year in the house, I hoed 15’x20′ feet for a garden of 33 items. Wasn’t until the cantaloupe seeds that I read the packages about sun, planting depth, spacing. whoops! We had 4 cantaloupe and the carrots (planted 12″ deep), came up the next year. Smaller, focused gardening is our new style. I plant tomatoes and basil for caprese salad all summer/fall + 1 new plant. Thanks for sharing your wisdom!

    • Katie Blakesley
      Posted May 12, 2016 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

      I loved seeing your name here. I love reading about the mishaps. We luckily have four 4′ beds in our backyard, so we aren’t doing anything too crazy. I love the idea of smaller, focused gardening. Our new berry plants were destroyed by the hail, so I guess you win some, you lose some…

  66. Posted May 12, 2016 at 10:24 am | Permalink

    What a great book I would love to win it. I love butterflies

  67. Suzy Roberts
    Posted May 12, 2016 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Oh I love the idea of this! What a special kind of “I spy” quilt that would be a fun gift for a toddler!

  68. Posted May 13, 2016 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

    What a lovely, thoughtful review. I’ve been seeing those story blocks pop everywhere, and they do look addictive. Unfortunately, I’m a very beginner-level gardener. Best tip, stick with lots of cherry tomato plants instead of going for the big guys. They’re more reliable, produce a ton, and are often tastier. Good luck!

  69. buntyw
    Posted May 17, 2016 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    This looks such a great book
    I love working in my garden – there;s nowhere else I’d rather be!

  70. Posted May 18, 2016 at 3:47 pm | Permalink

    Lovely looking book!! I love I spy quilts!

  71. janequiltsslowly
    Posted May 20, 2016 at 1:50 am | Permalink

    I have been seeing the storytelling blocks on Instagram and *love* them. My garden is my refuge. I have to plant a bunch of things this weekend. Hope the weather cooperates.

  72. Posted May 23, 2016 at 10:07 pm | Permalink

    I love this book I would love to make every quilt!

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